Special Issue of Constitutional Political Economy  on “Behavioral Approaches to Economic Governance”

Guest edited by Greg DeAngelo and Rustam Romaniuc

This year marks the tenth anniversary of Elinor Ostrom receiving the Nobel Prize in economics, along with Oliver E. Williamson, “for her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons.” In her work, Ostrom demonstrated, contrary to conventional thinking, that communities can self-organize. Examining dozens of real-world arrangements, Ostrom showed how diverse organizations and rules devised by community members help them avoid tragic outcomes without any regulation by state authorities or privatization. Her findings from the field and laboratory experiments challenged the core assumptions of microeconomics, as well as those of political economists. Moreover, this work has been seminal in generating new, innovative research. The aim of this special issue is to highlight advancements in spontaneous order and governance. We invite submissions that investigate the existence of multiple forms of governance for collective action from a behavioral perspective (empirically or theoretically). We particularly welcome original experimental work that takes a comparative perspective on self-governance. The special issue will appear in Constitutional Political Economy.

The submission deadline is March 1, 2020.

To be considered for publication in the special issue, please submit your manuscript online via Constitutional Political Economy’s online submission and editorial system, and select article type “Behavioral Approaches to Economic Governance”.

Special issue editors: Gregory DeAngelo (Claremont Graduate University) and Rustam Romaniuc (Claremont Graduate University). Should you have any questions, please contact Greg DeAngelo (gregory.deangelo@gmail.com) or Rustam Romaniuc (rustam.romaniuc@gmail.com) about the substance of the special issue.  

 

Summer Empirical Workshop

This workshop is for students interested in training in contemporary methods for causal inference, behavioral and experimental economics, machine learning, and data collection. It is a fully funded experience at the beautiful campus of Claremont Graduate University. The workshops will bring together several experts in the quantitative social sciences. It is mostly a lecture format with break out sessions in Stata, R, and Python. By the end of the workshops we believe that students will have increased level their competency and understanding of empirical methods, which will enable them to build on their own research.

When: June 9-14, 2019
Where: Claremont Graduate University
Cost: Free (travel stipend of $500)
Application deadline: May 1, 2019
Click Here to Apply

Two-Day Dissertation Workshop

This workshop is for graduate students who are entering the dissertation phase that are interested in training in contemporary methods for causal inference, machine learning, and data collection. It is a fully funded experience at the beautiful campus of Claremont Graduate University. The workshops will bring together several experts in the quantitative social sciences.The first day is committed to the introduction of new content through lectures and running scripts in a collaborative setting. The second day is committed to advancing dissertation ideas into practical “next steps”.

When: December 12-13, 2019
Where: Claremont Graduate University
Cost: Free (travel stipend of $500)
Application deadline: October 1, 2019
Click Here to Apply